Aug 28
Color Chaos
New Yorkers, unlike residents of some other cities, are not in the habit of referring to subway lines by color. Or even looking up, for that matter.
Even so, when the colors of the subway signs at Columbus Circle were switched (albeit accidentally) last weekend, the change in color was enough to throw some subway riders off of their normal routines.
Was the mix-up enough to cause Coney Island-bound New Yorkers to end up in Queens? According to the New York Times article, Cyclone hopefuls were spared the disappointment of hopping on the wrong subway line because the visuals above the track were correct (only the platform signs were reversed).
Our Creative Director, John, offers a different perspective. He noted that, while color is the primary factor in memory perception, the letters on the subway signs are large enough to dominate the simplistic shapes of the colors. Shape being the second factor in memory perception; everyone got from point A to point B with relatively little confusion. 
John did add that things might have been different if all the subway signs were suddenly in black and white. We just hope we’re not commuting if that day ever comes.
Image courtesy of New York Times

Color Chaos

New Yorkers, unlike residents of some other cities, are not in the habit of referring to subway lines by color. Or even looking up, for that matter.

Even so, when the colors of the subway signs at Columbus Circle were switched (albeit accidentally) last weekend, the change in color was enough to throw some subway riders off of their normal routines.

Was the mix-up enough to cause Coney Island-bound New Yorkers to end up in Queens? According to the New York Times article, Cyclone hopefuls were spared the disappointment of hopping on the wrong subway line because the visuals above the track were correct (only the platform signs were reversed).

Our Creative Director, John, offers a different perspective. He noted that, while color is the primary factor in memory perception, the letters on the subway signs are large enough to dominate the simplistic shapes of the colors. Shape being the second factor in memory perception; everyone got from point A to point B with relatively little confusion. 

John did add that things might have been different if all the subway signs were suddenly in black and white. We just hope we’re not commuting if that day ever comes.

Image courtesy of New York Times

1 Notes

  1. wallacechurch posted this

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